Helping to look after the Dunkeld Path Network

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P6 & P7 pupils from the Royal School Of Dunkeld recently joined the rangers for a morning of practical  work. The task to help fix the footpaths around Jubilee park and Birnam Oak which is part of the popular riverside walk.

The Pupils raked leaves, dug out muddy patches and wheelbarrowed material to fill In potholes. Pupils will use the practical  experience to help them achieve their John Muir award.

The Royal School of Dunkeld are working with various partners to improve and learn about the Greenspace surrounding the school.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blairgowrie & Rattray Access Network

The Cateran Yomp passes along the Gallowbank on its way to the finish at Bogles Field, so wishing to ensure no final mishaps for the runners, BRAN decided to give the path a good makeover.

Roger Mackey had cut the grass during the week and on Friday 7th, eight volunteers assembled to carry our strimming, hedge trimming, lopping, hand shearing and any necessary litter picking. The entire length of the path was included from Newton Street to Dunkeld Road. The weather was kind and the job was completed by lunchtime.

As a bonus Wendy Mackey kindly provided refreshments before the volunteers dispersed.

Those taking part were Cyril Reid, Paul Lumley (his first outing with the group), Ian Cruickshank, Eric Grant, Roger Mackey, Alan Comrie. Kristin Barrett and Ian Richards.

The photograph shows most of the group after completing their work.

2019_07_06 IMG_5041rs Gallowbank path

Grand Opening of Provost’s Walk

Everyone is welcome to join us at the opening of phase 3 of the Provost’s Walk in Auchterarder on Wednesday 3rd July at 2pm!

Starting south of the Public Park, off Western Road, the celebration event will begin at 14.00 with the ribbon cutting and shall then involve a visit along the path to the western end and back again.  The return distance is just over two kilometres and the path will be open to all non-motorised traffic – foot, bicycle, wheelchair/mechanical wheelchair, pram and horse.  This will be a great opportunity to meet with those involved, including funders, community path volunteers, and other members of the Auchterarder Community, some of whom have never visited this section of the path due to the poor condition of the surface, drainage and the narrow width plus difficult access at the western end. 

Never mind the weather!

Further works to improve the Provost Walk in Auchterarder are well underway, continuing the incredible work that has already been done to improve this path network.

Meanwhile the Auchterarder Core Paths Working Group have been incredibly busy on the Jubilee walk, public park and surrounding paths through organised tidy-up sessions – even in the torrential rain!

 

“We still managed to tidy some of the Provost with our new tools today! We were soon warm after a brushing work out. Followed by bramble pruning and a quick litter pick.  Primroses are flowering well now! Coffee n biscuits at the finish were well received. Thank you Jane.”

New helpers are more than welcome – for more about the group, take a look at their Facebook page here: https://en-gb.facebook.com/auchterardercorepaths/

Path Edging at MacRosty Park

Once the ground had defrosted in mid-February the Crieff Green Routes to Wellbeing group were able to start work on re-edging the paths around MacRosty Park. This turned out to be quite physical work. Using lawn-edgers we could cut the turf and soil back to where the new edge was to go, making sure to keep relatively neat lines. Using hoes, we could scrape the cut turf off the tarmac paths and sweep it into piles. The large amount of cut soil was then shovelled into wheel barrows, and many barrow loads were carted away. In places the grass had grown over the path by over half a foot on each side – meaning that once we had finished there was an addition foot of path to walk on! We are hoping to continue this good work over the next few weeks, targeting the areas where the paths have really been taken over.

If you have an interest in volunteering in MacRosty Park or with Community Greenspace please contact us at communitygreenspace@pkc.gov.uk

Dryside Road

Over the last couple of months the Portmoak Paths Group amd Portmoak Community Council have been working hard to maintain the historical “Dryside Road” core path that runs from Easter Balgedie, behind Wester Balgedie to GlenLomond, after which it continues as a vehicular route. The path is well known to some of the locals, but has never benefitted from proper signage. For their last meeting of the year, Ranger Calum met with the group on the 13th December to install new signage posts at either end of the path, as well as another at the start of the core path to Glenvale.

Some of the group standing by their work

We used a new signage design, one of the first to be used for the core paths in Perth and Kinross, and incorporated it into the new posts. Compared to the finger posts and large arrow blades used elsewhere, these new designs are smaller and mounted directly onto a shorter fence post. This allows easier installation and maintenance, as well as reducing the risk of signs being hit by large vehicles driving past – especially important to consider when placing signs at the entrance to farms! From a walker or cyclists perspective, the signs are at a better height for being read, and they are less intrusive on the landscape.

The newly-fitted core path signage

Moving forward, there are plans to further improve the path by installing a new gate and cutting back vegetation where the path has overgrown.

Maintaining paths in Pitlochry

On the 25th of October I went out to Pitlochry to help Jeannie out with the Pitlochry Path group. The day got off to a good start as I arrived in Pitlochry and I noticed that the group were very hard workers. The task the group were doing was repairing a path just past the train station.

On the train ride home I was treated to some beautiful views with all the trees turning into really nice reds and oranges and a few mesmerizing streams. When I got back to Perth I went to a Modern Apprentice meeting about how to behave on social media.

BRAN update.

 

Blairgowrie and Rattray Access Network (BRAN) continue to work in partnership to maintain and enhance the path network surrounding Blairgowrie and East Perthshire. Its been a busy summer for BRAN  with tasks such as grass cutting, strimming and cutting back which all helps to keep the path network open and accessible.

BRAN members recently met on 16th November to litter pick at the Riverside between Keithbank Mill and Brooklin Mill. Many more projects are planned over the winter months including the creation of a viewpoint and path improvements at the top of the Knockie path.

BRAN are always looking for new members and should you wish to come along please contact Ian Richards secretary-   ian_richards2007@yahoo.com

Flailing in Portmoak

On 22nd November we went out to meet the Portmoak Path Group, bringing along our “flail” – essentially a large grass cutter capable of cutting long and thick undergrowth. We were cutting the vegetation and grass along a 600m length of core path between Kinnesswood and Portmoak Moss, before it gets too overgrown. Despite a bit of rain, the flail made short work of the cutting while some volunteers used machetes to remove some bracken on the path edge.

The Portmoak Paths Group meets almost every week to maintain a variety of paths in the Kinnesswood/Baldegie area. If you would like to be involved, or to be put in contact with the group please contact Ranger Calum at cbachell@pkc.gov.uk

Portmoak Paths Group

On Thursday I met with some members of the Portmoak Paths Group to find out a bit about the work they are doing. We went to the paths on the hillside above Kinnesswood with the intention of de-berming some of the paths. Sharing the paths with the many walkers, joggers and cyclists are also some cattle. The intensive use of these paths combined with the heavy footfall of the cattle has resulted in trench-like paths with banks on either side. This creates small gulleys in which streams are formed after any rainfall, further eroding the paths.

Removing the banked sides of the paths and filling in the trenches had the effect of widening the paths and allowing water to flow off rather than along it. The result should be a reduced rate of erosion, less standing water (and therefore less mud) and paths that are easier to walk along.

In addition to the levelling out of paths the group also remove encroaching gorse and brush, cut back vegetation and carry out maintenance on a variety of paths in the area. There is always more to be done, as the path maintenance is an on-going but rewarding effort.

If you would like to join the Portmoak Paths Group, they would love to hear from you! They tend to meet every Thursday at 14.00 in the public car park in Kinnesswood (near to Portmoak Primary School). To get involved contact Greenspace Ranger Calum Bachell at cbachell@pkc.gov.uk

To find out about more volunteering opportunities in Perth and Kinross see our volunteer page